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Showing posts from September, 2019

Reader response

E.  thanked me for the previous post, An old story, and said she appreciates my last statement: While l press for women’s ordination, I’m not anxious about it, because time is on the side of the women.  The longer the official CC delays, the less relevance it will have in real life.  Its institutional structure will crumble. That sustains me and gives me hope!Peace.
I replied, I'm pleased, surprised, and also not surprised that a professed religious can think this way.  It tells me I'm right when I tell people they'd be surprised by how much their most progressive views are also represented among religious sisters.
E: Oh Jeanette, There are quite a few of us who believe that the institutional CC needs a lot of reform…and openness.
Given thatreligious communities have also had their share of decadence, reform and ongoing need for reform, we tend to be patient … at least outwardly. But we do pray … and sometimes act … for a more gospel-like CC.
Jeanette: I knew many of you w…

An old story

Women doing the real work but not recognized.What’s new? Preparations for a Catholic synod of bishops from the Amazon posed another version of the story.
Conservatives objected to suggestions for ways the Church could meet the vast needs of people threatened by ecological destruction in the Amazon basin. The document opened for consideration ordaining married priests and . . .     What did it say about women? It suggested identifying “the type of official ministry that can be conferred on women, taking into account the central role they play today in the Church in the Amazon."  A timid approach to women’s ordination. Official ministers in the Catholic Church are ordained—the only true and sure way for women to continue the work they already are doing.
But U.S. Cardinal Raymond Burke said he would undertake a 40-day "crusade of prayer and fasting" in hopes that the synod’s document would not be approved because it contains "theological errors and heresies."I …

Richard Rohr reflection

When I read or hear Richard Rohr, I am reassured. If this beloved and renowned Franciscan can say what he says, I belong where I am—in the Catholic Church, challenging its damaging teaching. He calls his theology “alternative orthodoxy.” That’s what I can call my set of beliefs. Rohr takes issue with the belief in original sin, taught to Christians since before medieval times.
I agree with Rohr that everybody is born with divinity inside her- or himself; we are not born with a sin that needs to be erased. When I was studying theology for a Master’s degree, the pronouncements of theologians who assumed people are born with original sin repelled me. Anselm of Canterbury’s interpretation seemed the most outrageous.
To vent my scorn, I translated his ideas into a tragicomedy, a medieval drama with a cast of three: The feudal LORD-GOD who collects payments of honor, MAN who was created to give honor to LORD-GOD, and GOD-MAN JESUS.
In the beginning, MAN dishonors LORD-GOD by sinning. He…